Discussing the State of Biomedical Data & Looking Towards the Future at PMWC

DNAnexus once again attended the Precision Medicine World Conference (PMWC) in January in Santa Clara, California, to learn about new innovative technologies, thriving initiatives, and clinical case studies that enable the translation of precision medicine into direct improvements in health care.

George Asimenos, Chief Technology Officer, hosted a panel discussing the challenges in applying AI on biomedical data and the future of using AI in regulated contexts. Brady Davis, VP Strategy and Marketing, also moderated a discussion on the future of DNA sequencing interpretation, touching on how visualizations are driving the understanding of human genomes & diseases.

You can view the recorded panel discussions below:

Challenges In Applying AI On Biomedical Data

Challenges in AI Panel

Moderator: George Asimenos, PhD, CTO, DNAnexus

Panelists:

  • University of Washington, Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering – Su-In Lee, PhD, Associate Professor
  • UCSF, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center – Laura J. van’t Veer, PhD, Leader, Breast Oncology Program, and Director
  • Regeneron Genetics Center – Jeffrey Reid, PhD, Head of Genome Informatics

Abstract:

AI methods promise to revolutionize the way we approach medicine, by building and training models that make accurate predictions. But the application of AI in actual biomedical contexts comes with distinct challenges. This session features speakers in the forefront of real-life AI applications, who will discuss challenges such as how to reach an interpretable/explainable AI model and how to apply AI in a regulated context.

Data Curation, Integration and Visualization

Data Curation Panel

Moderator: Brady Davis, VP Strategy and Marketing, DNAnexus

Panelists:

  • Stanford University, Department of Genetics – J. Michael Cherry, PhD, Professor
  • AncestryDNA – Eurie Hong, PhD, Senior Director of Genomics
  • UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute – Benedict Paten, PhD, Assistant Professor

Abstract:

Understanding the relationship between the millions of functional DNA elements and their protein regulators, and how they work in conjunction to manifest diverse phenotypes, is a key to advancing our understanding of the human genome and diseases. As the cost of DNA sequencing continue to drop, the interpretation of the ever increasing amount of data generated represents a considerable challenge.