Meet Us in Atlanta for AACR

We will be joining thousands of oncology researchers and clinicians this week at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting, March 29 – April 3 at the Georgia World Congress Center. Stop by our booth #3051 to learn how DNAnexus Apollo enables advanced exploration of cancer datasets for therapeutic target discovery. Our scientific experts will be onsite all week for demos and to answer all your bioinformatics questions.

Last year at AACR, in partnership with St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Microsoft, St. Jude Cloud was launched, the largest public repository of pediatric genomic cancer data. Offering a suite of unique analysis tools and visualizations, researchers can efficiently mine, analyze, and visualize next-generation sequencing data for pediatric cancer and other life threatening diseases to accelerate scientific discoveries.

This year, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital is celebrating the one year anniversary of the St. Jude Cloud and since its inception, 10,000 WGS data have been analyzed in continuation of the search to find a cure for pediatric cancer and other life-threatening diseases. If you want to know more about the St. Jude Cloud, visit their booth #4136. We are excited to celebrate the one year anniversary with St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and St. Jude Cloud team – how cool is it that we’re back at AACR together?!

Make sure to stop by either DNAnexus booth or the St. Jude Cloud booth, to celebrate with us at AACR! Check out our conference activities below. Can’t make it to any of our events? Request a meeting.

Demo: Explore Millions of Clinico-Genomic Data Points in Seconds with DNAnexus Apollo

  • Monday, April 1st – 1:00pm-2:00pm
  • Tuesday, April 2nd – 10:30am-11:30am

Cancer genomics is advancing precision medicine, leading to better diagnoses and treatment strategies. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), extensively characterized over 20,000 primary cancer and matched normal samples, creating a deep resource of over 25 petabytes of genomic, epigenomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data. This landmark program has already lead to improvements in researchers’ ability to diagnose, treat and prevent cancer, yet mining this type of data for novel findings remains a huge endeavor.

DNAnexus Apollo enables at-scale navigation and exploration on combined genotypic and phenotypic data, whether it is TCGA data, your own protected data, or a combination. What actionable information will you find in your cancer datasets?

Customer Poster

3671 / 29 – Visualize 10,000 Whole Genomes from Pediatric Cancer Patients on St. Jude Cloud 

  • April 2nd, 1 – 5pm
  • Presenter: Clay McLeod, St Jude Children’s Research Hospital

Shaping the Future of Precision Medicine for Newborns

A Recap of Frontiers in Pediatric Genomic Medicine Conference

Rady Children’s Institute for Genomic Medicine’s (RCIGM) Frontiers in Pediatric Genomic Medicine Conference took place last week on the scenic shores of La Jolla, California. The third annual conference brought together innovators from children’s hospitals and genetics labs around the world who are making big strides in the field of pediatric genomics.  

The meeting began each day with a poignant patient story. Parents held their infant on stage while sharing the story of the very emotionally-trying start to their baby’s life. In all cases these babies were admitted to Rady’s NICU at less than one week old with unexplainable medical conditions linked to the nervous system. With no immediate diagnosis, the newborns’ bodies rapidly were shutting down, and in each case, the parents were told they would likely lose their baby.

With the parents consent, the newborns underwent rapid whole-genome sequencing (rWGS) to try and determine the cause of their symptoms. Leveraging Rady’s rWGS pipeline results were turned around in about a day. In each case, rWGS enabled the team at Rady’s to successfully identify a rare but treatable genetic disorder so the newborn could undergo targeted therapy to dramatically alter the course of the disease. The babies were able to be taken home from the NICU shortly after diagnosis, and are healthy and happy today.

Throughout the conference, other organizations shared their success stories of whole genome or exome sequencing for rapid diagnosis in newborns. Speakers also made a financial case for performing genomic sequencing on newborns, demonstrating that healthcare costs saved by a reduced length of hospitalization and ongoing care add up to more than the investment for sequencing. It is possible to save lives without increasing costs, a win-win for everyone.   

Hearing case study after case study of successful and rapid diagnosis with genomic sequencing in newborns drove home the message that the medical community is seeing concrete value in investing in rWGS. Further, as sequencing and bioinformatics technology continues to improve, physicians will have earlier access to genomic information to inform treatment decisions. As rWGS continues to gain momentum, genomic testing can become more universally available so newborns and their families can get the right diagnosis and the right treatment in time.

Integrating Multiple Data Sources to Power Discovery and Analysis

Precision Medicine World Conference (PMWC) took place in January in Mountain View, California, and offered attendees the opportunity to learn about innovative technologies, initiatives, and clinical case studies that are catalyzing the adoption of precision medicine in the clinic. DNAnexus was pleased to host a panel to discuss scalable infrastructure/platforms integrating next-generation sequencing (NGS) and other data (e.g. phenotypic) to power discovery and analysis in pharma and the clinic. Learn more below and watch the panel discussion.

Moderator: DNAnexus, Brady Davis, Chief Strategy Officer

 

Panelists:
AstraZeneca/MedImmune – David Fenstermacher, VP BioInformatics

Sutter Health – Greg Tranah,  Director, CPMC Research Institute, Adjunct Professor Dept. of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, UCSF

 Carol Franc Buck Breast Cancer Center at UCSF– Laura Esserman, Director

City of Hope – Sorena Nadaf, SVP & CIO

 

Abstract:

Health care providers increasingly require multi-omic datasets, including phenotypic data informed by genomic data. Such data needs to be obtained in an economically sustainable way and made available on an agile user-friendly platform so that these data may inform clinical care and lead to health improvements.

Pharmaceutical companies are interested in obtaining datasets containing phenotypic/clinical and genomic information generated from patient cohorts of specific disease areas. Such datasets can help pharma researchers identify drug targets or find biomarkers, validate hypotheses related to the interaction of genomics with disease or with specific therapies, and identify candidate populations for future clinical trials. Payers are also interested in the outcomes related to new discoveries and therapies in order to reimburse for these treatments.

This discussion focuses on how healthcare provider organizations, pharmas and payers are working toward solving these complex and challenging problems from a technical and business model perspective.