PMWC 2018: Leveraging Multi-Omic Datasets in Discovery & Clinical Trials

The Precision Medicine World Conference kicks off next week at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California. The program traverses innovative technologies, thriving initiatives, and clinical case studies that enable the translation of precision medicine into direct improvements.

Please join us for a lively panel discussion around scalable infrastructure/platforms that integrate next-generation sequencing (NGS) and other data (e.g. phenotypic) to power discovery in Pharma and the clinic.

Title: Scalable NGS Infrastructure/Platforms
Talk Details: Track 1 – Monday, January 22 at 10:30am
Moderator: Brady Davis, Chief Strategy Officer, DNAnexus

Panel Speakers:

  • AstraZeneca/MedImmune – David Fenstermacher, VP BioInformatics
  • Sutter Health – Greg Tranah,  Director, CPMC Research Institute, Adjunct Professor Dept. of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, UCSF
  • Carol Franc Buck Breast Cancer Center at UCSF– Laura Esserman, Director
  • City of Hope – Sorena Nadaf, SVP & CIO

Abstract:

Health care providers increasingly require multi-omic datasets, including phenotypic data informed by genomic data. Such data needs to be obtained in an economically sustainable way and made available on an agile user-friendly platform so that these data may inform clinical care and lead to health improvements.

Pharmaceutical companies (“Pharmas”) are interested in obtaining datasets containing phenotypic/clinical and genomic information generated from patient cohorts of specific disease areas. Such datasets can help Pharma researchers identify drug targets or find biomarkers, validate hypotheses related to the interaction of genomics with disease or with specific therapies, and identify candidate populations for future clinical trials. Payers are also interested in the outcomes related to new discoveries and therapies in order to reimburse for these treatments.

This session will focus on how both healthcare provider organizations, Pharmas and Payers are working toward solving these complex and challenging problems from a technical and business model perspective.

 

Rady Children’s Quest to Finding That Needle in a Haystack

Rady Children’s Institute for Genomic Medicine (RCIGM), located in San Diego, has announced a pioneering effort to deliver life-changing genetic diagnoses for children suffering from rare diseases. Led by president and CEO, Dr. Stephen Kingsmore, Rady is building an end-to-end clinical whole genome data analysis solution, built on the DNAnexus Platform, for children’s hospitals nationally.

The impact of diagnosis by WGS is often life changing. The team routinely tests critically ill children for over 5,000 diseases, of which more than 500 have highly effective treatments. For example, if the test reveals a mutation in a gene involved in digestion, causing the inability to process a particular nutrient thereby leading to buildup of a poisonous byproduct, a simple change in diet can limit the effects of the disease. The sooner this condition can be diagnosed the less damage the child will suffer. In these cases, minutes literally matter.

Dr. Kingsmore’s vision is to ensure genome-powered diagnosis is accessible to every child who needs it. Building a world-class pipeline at a single hospital isn’t enough. RCIGM needed a solution that could scale and be deployed at institutions around the world. DNAnexus provides the technology and expertise that allows RCIGM to grow an innovative pediatric-focused genomics network, distribute its clinical tools and collaborate with colleagues in a secure and compliant environment.

This work was done as part of RCIGM’s collaboration with the The Newborn Sequencing In Genomic medicine and public HealTh (NSIGHT) program. NSIGHT addresses how genomic sequencing can replicate or augment known screening results for newborn disorders, what knowledge sequencing can provide for conditions not currently screened, and what additional clinical information could be learned from sequencing relevant to the clinical care of newborns. The NSIGHT program is funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), components of the National Institutes of Health.

DNAnexus provides a flexible platform that connects Edico Genome’s ultra-fast variant calling algorithms with Fabric Genomics’ interpretation software, and integrates seamlessly with Rady Children’s custom data interpretation portal. Users monitor jobs, organize and share data, and compare patients’ data to a diagnostic resource within the network. At DNAnexus, we are proud to support Dr. Kingsmore and RCGIM’s endeavor to prevent, diagnose, and treat childhood diseases through genomics research.

ACMG: A Look at Applying Genomic Data to Clinical Reports

The annual American College of Medical Geneticists (ACMG) conference meets this week (March 21-25, 2017) in Phoenix, Arizona, providing an outstanding forum to learn how genetics and genomics are being integrated into medical and clinical practice. Eric Venner, from the Human Genome Sequencing Center (HGSC) at Baylor College of Medicine, will present the following poster (Abstract Number 368): Generating Clinical Reports from Genomic Data on the Cloud-based Neptune Platform  on Friday March 24th 10:30AM-12:00PM

In order to meet the demand for timely and cost-efficient clinical reporting, HGSC developed Neptune, an automated analytical platform to sign out and deliver clinical reports. The process starts when a clinical site uploads a test requisition to the HIPAA compliant environment on DNAnexus. Next, de-identified samples are analyzed with HGSC’s variant calling pipeline, Mercury, which feeds into the reporting pipeline, Neptune. Variants of putative clinical relevance are identified for manual review and possible addition to a VIP database of clinically relevant variation. The VIP database currently holds 20,872 SNPs and 3,946 indels, as well as a curated set of copy number variants.

Neptune’s manual review interface was designed with a clinical geneticist in mind. Users can login, curate variants in their samples, update the VIP database accordingly and create clinical reports. Early applications include reporting for the NIH Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network III where more than 14,500 samples and a panel of 109 genes will be processed over the course of three years.

eMERGE is a national network that combines DNA biorepositories with electronic medical record (EMR) systems for large scale, high-throughput genetic research to support investigating how personalized treatments impact patient care. Research so far has led to significant discoveries across a wide range of diseases, including prostate cancer, leukemia, and diabetes.  DNAnexus and the Human Genome Sequencing Center (HGSC) at Baylor College of Medicine worked to build the eMERGE Commons, a data repository where genomic data are merged with patient electronic medical records (EMR), as well as analysis results and bioinformatics tools to be accessed and applied by eMERGE researchers.